Case Studies

The Justice Programme

The Justice Programme is a series of workshops that tour Wales using drama as a tool to demonstrate to children and young people the impact of crime and how the criminal justice system operates. Aimed at young people at risk of entering the criminal justice system, actors and a facilitator host the workshops where a ‘relevant and hard hitting’ scenario is enacted, leading to the protagonist being arrested and facing criminal court action. The scenario is informed by the police to ensure that it represents current crime trends - currently county lines. Justice in a Day, one of the programme’s three workshops, is a full day session which culminates with a transfer to a local magistrates court. Participants are able to watch the protagonist in court with real-life magistrates and PCSO’s playing key roles, adding to the impact and authenticity of the project. The project prevents and discourages young people from going down the route of criminality, provides an opportunity to address questions that young people may not otherwise be able to ask and explores the impact of criminal behaviour on offender, victim and wider community.

Outcomes

• 10,000+ young people benefited

• Increased empathy and self awareness of participants

• Increased understanding of the impact of criminal behaviour

• Improved decision making and longer term consequential thinking

• Increased self confidence and awareness of personal responsibility

• Reduction in numbers entering the Youth Criminal Justice system

Joe’s Story

Joe, 15, attends a Pupil Referral Unit and had already been involved with the police. Before attending Justice in a Day, he’d mentioned that he was going to smash the car window of a man he’d argued with. Following the workshop, Joe decided not to smash the window because of his new understanding of the consequences.

“He has changed his behaviour since Justice in a Day. He understands there are consequences and wants to keep out of trouble. Teacher speaking about a student who attended Justice in a Day”

-Teacher speaking about Joe after he attended Justice in Day.

Arts From The Armchair

Dementia is a major public health issue affecting 1 in 20 over the age of 65 and 1 in 5 over the age of 80. As life expectancy increases more people will live with dementia diseases. At the heart of our work is a commitment to use the arts as a tool to improve the quality of life for those living with illness. Arts from the Armchair, run in partnership with Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, supports both people with early onset dementia and their carers to adjust to their new circumstances. Both the participant and their carer take part in the programme - working together, having fun and stimulating brain functions. Part one of the session focuses on communication and movement, supporting cognitive skills and memory muscles, while the second part introduces participants to activities that create new memories, rooted in the present.

Using arts-led activities groups experience something new each week. For one man, his wife’s primary carer, the sessions help him “get his wife back” for the following three days, lessening the sense of loss that carers often feel.

Outcomes

• Helps participants adjust to their ‘new normality’ living with dementia

• Stimulates declining brain and memory function

• Builds self-confidence

• A fun, shared experience that creates new memories and gives carers respite and support

• Develops new strategies to help carers support their partner

“I’d been feeling absolutely dreadful caring but when we come here it is like a great burden has been lifted off my shoulders.”
- Arts From The Armchair Participant

Connect and Flourish

During the pandemic we worked extensively with disadvantaged and vulnerable young people. We enabled young people to collaborate, and then to form how they want Theatr Clwyd, and the Social Services, to work with them into the future – creating a participant-led and driven programme to support them. All participant referrals were made by Flintshire Social Services to this programme.

Rachel* is a young carer and social services asked her if she wanted to be part of Connect and Flourish as a form of respite. She cares for her younger brother who has cerebral palsy. Attending the sessions, she discovered her voice and singing is something she has a talent for. Rachel had been enjoying the sessions, although she felt her brother should be joining her to share the experience. Now they are enjoying the sessions together.

Ben* didn’t go to school and had a negative approach to learning. Through Connect and Flourish, music has become something he is infatuated with and via the programme had the opportunity to play the guitar. Through the programme has learned to play several chords. After the programme we were able to source him a guitar so he can continue his newfound passion.

Anna* wants to be a ‘fashion designer’. Anna is from Romania, has lost her mum she been through 3 foster homes in the 12 weeks we’ve known her. We introduced her to our fashion department and oversaw the costumes for the project.

Rob* is a stage combat enthusiast! Rob has ADHD, has the learning age of 6-8 at 15.
These sessions can have a significant impact on the lives of the participants, it can signify fun and hope for their futures in becoming young adults.

*names changed for confidentiality.